Shades of Love is dedicated to sexual education for adults young and old.
We want you to have fun with yourself and your loved one(s) when you decide to have sex.

Learn a little bit of education that you can take to the bedroom and beyond during sex.

Before You Buy

Don’t be ashamed to try and find the right toy that fits you.

For instance, if you get a dildo that is too small, you don’t get any pleasure. A dildo that is too large can hurt and can also leave you high and dry.

Test out different textures. Most of our toys come in many different finishes, so don’t immediately buy the first one you see. You may want something a bit more rigid (like glass) or soft (like silicone).

Ask questions. One of the most common things we see are shy young adults. If you have any questions about what you’re looking for, ask by either calling us, reaching us through our contact form, or talking to our people in the store.

Sex education is important. As adults, we all need comprehensive understanding about sexuality and healthy adult relationships. Our sex classes and programs are designed to help old and young adults start talking about their development, be it emotional, sexual, or something else entirely.

Condoms

/ˈkändəm/ | Noun
A sheathe placed over a penis during sex.

Condoms are typically used for penises, but there are condoms designed for vaginas as well.

Condoms are used to:

  • Collect semen and prevent it from going anywhere post-ejaculation
  • Prevent the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV, AIDS, Hepatitis, and more

Some condoms have an oily substance on the outside known as spermicide. Spermicidal condoms are advertised to kill sperm as they collect semen. However, spermicide has no proven effects on killing sperm and could increase the chance of a woman getting a UTI. A condom with spermicide is still considered better for safe sex than no condom at all.

If your partner says condoms aren’t worth it, talk about it. Condoms prevent up to 98 percent of pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). If you are in healthy sexual relationships, your partner should be willing to use condoms if you want to.

Dildo

/ˈdildō/ | Noun
A penis-shaped object used for stimulation and penetration.

Dildos typically look like penises but often come in many different shapes and sizes.

While people can’t exactly test out the inventory at Shades of Love, you could go to the produce store and get a cucumber or other cylindrical vegetable. This might sound goofy, but cucumbers are a perfectly safe item that can be a bit of fun (though you might want to wash it before you start doing the deed). If you decide to use a vegetable as an example dildo, make sure you cover it in a condom.

When you get your cucumber, adjust it for perfect use. If it’s too big, shave it down (if needed). You can also adjust the cucumber to curve to stimulate the G-spot or other erogenous zones.

Once you’ve molded your cucumber into the perfect fit, measure the length, width, and shape. When you have these details, give the Shades of Love team your dimensions and they’ll show you what fits.

If you have multiple dildos, store them apart from each other. There are no health risks with storing them together, but if the dildos rub together, the material may degrade faster. If you must store them together, separate them using fabric or cloth.

Vibrator

/ˈvīˌbrādər/ | Noun
An electronic device that uses quick “vibrating” movement for sexual stimulation.

Vibrators can be used for penetration as well as external stimulation.

Clean and dry off vibrators after each use. Vibrators are designed to work in wet conditions, but too much moisture can damage the electronics inside.

Remove the vibrator batteries after each use. This will help the batteries (and the vibrator) to last longer during sex. Also, this will prevent accidentally leaving the vibrator on.

Lubricant

/ˈlo͞obrəkənt/ | Noun
A liquid substance used to reduce friction and enhance sex.

Lubes often come in three basic forms:

  • Oil-based — Lubrication that helps avoid chafing over a long period of time. Not recommended for partner-based sex due to messy clean-up and possible infections. Mineral oil-based lubes also degrade condoms and render them useless. Never use mineral oil as a lubrication while using condoms.
  • Water-based — Easy lubrication with simple clean-up. Water-based lubes are found in some diaphragms, condoms, dams, and other sexual protection products. These lubes can dry out the fastest and, if they contain glycerin, can cause yeast infections.
  • Silicone-based — Long-lasting lubrication that is water resistant and dries out slowly. Can damage sex toys also made of silicone.

Note: Use lube on your arm or hand before sex. This makes sure you are not allergic before deciding to rub it on your most private parts (Also, it would probably be good to get your partner to test it out before use).

Still Have Questions?

Don’t be ashamed. Your sexuality is important and the only way it can improve is by talking to other adults about it.

Get real sexual education with our comprehensive sex ed classes in San Antonio. Our school informs and reforms the ways that you think about sex, love, and all the stuff in between.

If you still have questions, please don’t wait to contact us on our form or by calling us. We’re always ready to answer your questions.
Contact Us Here or Call Today! 210-494-3006